Cinnamon, the balancer

 

In all the research that is going on in the world, it would greatly benefit if the entire scientific community, particularly the doctors know  the power of spices. For instance, cinnamon is a spice that is not just aromatic but also has a lot of medicinal properties and has always been recognised for this since time immemorial.

cinnamonCinnamon is native to Sri Lanka, formerly known as Ceylon and the south-eastern coast of India, while the closely related Cassia is native to China. Cinnamon and Cassia are both small tropical evergreen trees that grow up to 20 – 30 feet tall, with aromatic bark and leaves.It has been used as an ingredient throughout history, dating back as far as Ancient Egypt. It used to be rare and valuable, and was regarded as a gift fit for kings. In fact, even wars have been fought for cinnamon and the Taoists have called it the ‘food of the Gods’.

Coming to our body and health, a paradox in metabolism is that, while the vast majority of complex life on the planet requires oxygen for its existence, oxygen is a highly reactive molecule that damages living organisms by producing reactive oxygen species.

Consequently, organisms contain a complex network of antioxidant metabolites and enzymes that work together to prevent oxidative damage to cellular components such as DNA, proteins and lipids.

In general, antioxidant systems either prevent these reactive species from being formed, or remove them before they can damage vital components of the cell. Thus, the function of antioxidant systems is not to remove oxidants entirely, but instead to keep them at an optimum level. Here, cinnamon is supposed to be very good. Apart from this, it is  considered to be good in controlling diabetes, heart ailments and arthritis.

In my case, I did and do include cinnamon in my diet, particularly after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis. For those who are not aware, multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder of the CNS (central nervous system in which myelin components are particularly targeted by the immune system resulting in demyelination of axons and associated debilitating symptoms, In spite of intense investigations, no effective therapy is available for this disease yet.

Personally, I have benefitted from various therapies (all natural) as I did not and doo not wish to be a guinea pig on all the scientific research going on in the allopathic world. Here, cinnamon has become a part of my life. The best thing of course is that this can be easily done by not making major lifestyle changes. Side effects, if any, are only positive.

Apart from the herbs, my entire journey on recovery has taught me that health and life in general is all about maintaining balance in all areas and yes, listening to what our body, mind and spirit is telling us.

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